The Johnny Cash Museum, Long Live the Man in Black

 Johnny Cash Museum
119 3rd Avenue South, Suite 110
Nashville, TN 37201
 

 

Back in September 2012 during the previous ION GNSS conference, I shared a cab with a friendly lady who lived in downtown Nashville.  Although the drive is only about 15 minutes long, we started talking since I had never been to Nashville before.  After some small talk, she shared a childhood memory of living down the street from Johnny Cash where she would frequently see him on his porch.  She was young and didn’t appreciate who he was at the time, but she said “he doesn’t always wear black.”  I couldn’t help but smile about that.  You could just see the nostalgia on her face and in her voice.  A great memory indeed.  For mostly everyone else, the Nashville, Tennessee Johnny Cash Museum will be the closest that we will ever get to him.

Outside of the Johnny Cash Museum in Nashville, TN

Outside of the Johnny Cash Museum in Nashville, TN

The museum wasn’t open in 2012, but when I was back in September 2013 I didn’t miss it.  So, before I flew home, I footed it from my hotel to the museum.  You enter through the strategically placed museum store off 3rd avenue.  Going straight to the counter, I bought one general admission ticket for $14.00, sold by the friendly Sierra.

My Johnny Cash Museum Ticket

My Johnny Cash Museum Ticket

The museum isn’t large, but this collection of memorabilia and interactive exhibits is really impressive.  The flow of the museum starts with his early years, school, start of his music career, etc and continues on through his later years concluding with his fantastic Nine Inch Nails cover, “Hurt”.  There were a few secluded side rooms that focused on his wonderful poem narrative, “Ragged Old Flag” and his extensive movie and television career.  For me, It was a very personal story telling the amazing life of this influential man.

Maintaining the flow of the museum, I tried to capture the atmosphere of the wonderful exhibits, mementos and diverse accomplishments and memories below.  Welcome to the House of Cash….

The museum and exhibits when you first walk in.

The museum and exhibits when you first walk in.

J.R. Cash's Birth Certificate

J.R. Cash’s Birth Certificate

 

Young J.R. Cash

Young J.R. Cash

 

J.R. Cash in High School (Junior) J.R. Cash is Top Row, 2nd from Right

J.R. Cash in High School (Junior)
J.R. Cash is Top Row, 2nd from Right

 

J.R. Cash in High School (Senior) J.R. Cash is Bottom, 3rd from Left.

J.R. Cash in High School (Senior)
J.R. Cash is Bottom, 3rd from Left.

 

Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two Johnny Cash's first band.

Johnny Cash and the Tennessee Two
Johnny Cash’s first band.

 

Johnny Cash - 1950's

Johnny Cash – 1950’s

 

Johnny Cash - 1960's

Johnny Cash – 1960’s

 

Johnny Cash - 1970's

Johnny Cash – 1970’s

 

Johnny Cash - 1980's

Johnny Cash – 1980’s

 

Johnny Cash - 1990's

Johnny Cash – 1990’s

 

Johnny Cash - 2000's

Johnny Cash – 2000’s

 

The Million Dollar Quartet, signed photograph

The Million Dollar Quartet, signed photograph

 

Johnny Cash State Shirt, Boots and Photograph

Johnny Cash State Shirt, Boots and Photograph

 

The Folsom Concert Set List

The Folsom Concert Set List

 

Johnny Cash Custom Gibson J-200 Acoustic Guitar (1959)

Johnny Cash Custom Gibson J-200 Acoustic Guitar (1959)

 

The House of Cash

The House of Cash

 

Some of Johnny Cash's Musical Achievements

Some of Johnny Cash’s Musical Achievements

 

Ragged Old Flag Lyrics

Ragged Old Flag Lyrics

 

Ragged Old Flag Video

Ragged Old Flag Video

 

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Valentine for June (1998)

Valentine for June (1998)

 

Johnny Cash on the balcony where Lincoln was assassinated in Ford's Theatre

Johnny Cash on the balcony where Lincoln was assassinated in Ford’s Theatre

 

Johnny Cash at the famous lake house on 200 Caudill Drive with stones (not shown) from the Hurt video after it burnt down.

Johnny Cash at the famous lake house on 200 Caudill Drive with stones (not shown) from the Hurt video after it burnt down.

 

 

Johnny Cash and Paul McCartney with the shirt he wore

Johnny Cash and Paul McCartney with the shirt he wore

 

The Moon Man from Mtv Video Music Awards for his Video "Hurt" (2003)

The Moon Man from Mtv Video Music Awards for his Video “Hurt” (2003)

 

Johnny Cash D-42JC Custom Signature Guitar #65 of 200 from the Martin Guitar Company

Johnny Cash D-42JC Custom Signature Guitar #65 of 200 from the Martin Guitar Company

 

A Johnny Cash Original Art

A Johnny Cash Original Art

 

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Nashville is a wonderfully vibrant town, with lots of things to see and do.  The live music scene is, not surprisingly, amazing.  You would be hard pressed to visit a bar that did not have very talented, live music playing let alone the big names that continuously tour through Nashville.  While I was there for example, Taylor Swift was on her Red Tour.  Of course they have professional sports, such as the NFL Tennessee Titans and NHL Nashville Predators.  And a plethora of bars, great restaurants and museums such as the famous Merchants Restaurant & Bar and the Country Music Hall of Fame.  Although the Johnny Cash Museum is worth a trip in itself, the rest of Nashville should not be missed either.

Taylor Swift's Red Tour Buses

Taylor Swift’s Red Tour Buses

 

Just one of the many lively bars in Nashville of exciting Broadway

Just one of the many lively bars in Nashville of exciting Broadway

 

The famous Merchants Restaurant off Broadway

The famous Merchants Restaurant off Broadway

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Photography Backup Process

Oh, the devastating scenario of loosing all or even some of your hard work!  I don’t know what I would do if I were to loose all of my pictures and documents.  However, it is a necessary evil when being so dependent upon personal computers (PCs).  As an aspiring photographer, you would think that I would be on top of backing up and protecting my images.  Nope.  I neglected this incredibly important workflow step for far too long.  Thus, I spent a good deal of time in early 2012 researching various processes of backing up your data to find a method that works best for me.  The most important requirements for me were, ease of integration into existing workflow, cost and 100% protection of my files.  I finally settled on one pretty common, simple, reliable backup process that will guarantee file security without breaking the bank.  This article shares my current backup process at home, my backup process in the field and verification plan for verifying the integrity of my data for years to come.

My goal is to ensure that I am protected from loosing my important pictures and documents, as it would be impossible for me to replace them.  So how do I implement a process that is reliable, simple and equally important, affordable?  Let’s discuss what I already had available to start off with:
  • My laptop running Windows 7 64-bit
  • (1) 2TB networked Western Digital external hard drive
  • Read/Write DVDs, which I was burning my original JPEG + RAW files to.

Not a bad setup, had I been using it properly.  I could easily make a simple backup from my laptop to the external hard drive on a routine basis (riskily I wasn’t even doing this).  Using both the (1) external hard drive and DVDs, they would give me potentially (2) layers of backup protection.  However, I was not addressing my operating system backup, nor was I even copying the same files to the external hard drive that I was to the DVDs.  Yes, I know I was setting myself up for failure and I knew it.  Researching both what others are doing and what the recommended ‘best practices’ are, I found one process from American Society of Media Photographers (ASMP) that I felt could be manipulated to fit into my workflow and utilizing my existing equipment.

The one consistent recommendation I found was that everyone should practice a backup process with at least (3) layers of protection.  The most common instantiation of this is:

  • (2) External Hard Drives
    • (1) External Hard Drive for local backup
    • (1) External Hard Drive for offsite storage
  • (1) Disc copy (DVD or Blu-Ray)

Made sense to me.  So, all I needed was an extra external hard drive to implement the infrastructure to support a reliable backup process.  I ended up buying a 2TB Western Digital USB 3.0 External Hard Drive so that I could back it up locally and have the option to put it in a safety deposit box or fireproof safe for offsite storage.

Now that I have the (3) layer backup protection hardware infrastructure implemented, how do I make it work in practice?  This is easier said than done because of the variables that I had, which were the fact that I am using a laptop so it’s not always home, no backup software chosen, I was undecided on what exactly to backup, and I had different external hard drive interfaces (1) network drive and (1) USB drive.  Since I travel with my laptop half the time, a regular scheduled backup isn’t really practical.  So, I required software that permits me to schedule backups to both the network and USB external hard drives either on a regular schedule or manually.

I asked Tom Bourdon, a fantastic professional travel photographer, about his travel photography backup process and he uses SyncToy from Microsoft.  ASMP recommended SyncBack for PC users and ChronoSync for Mac users.  Reviewing them, I felt SyncToy (FREE) worked better for my simple process.  Although I am a PC user, ChronoSync is operationally similar to SyncToy.  So, the backup concepts presented herein are synonymous for Windows and Mac users.

Using SyncToy, I created folder pairs to backup specific folders from my laptop to the target external hard drives.  Folder pairs, set as ‘echo’, are used to generate exact copies of my laptop folders on the external hard drives.  This is used for my Working folder, which contains my plethora of images to be edited, and specific folders from my laptop Users folder.  In addition, a ‘contribute‘ folder pair, which only appends files, is used to copy my laptop Transferred folder to an archive folder on the external drives.  The Transferred folder contains finished images that are archived to DVD(s) before removal from my laptop, thus continually maintaining (3) layers of protection.  Presently for offsite storage, the archived DVD(s) are stored in a local fireproof safe; however a safety deposit box or online storage is very effective for addressing this requirement.  The below Figure depicts SyncToy and the folder pairs utilized either individually or all at once.

The Microsoft SyncToy software with the folder pairs used

The Microsoft SyncToy software with the folder pairs used

In addition to SyncToy, I use Windows Backup and Restore (In Windows 7 for under Control Panel -> System and Security -> Backup and Restore) capability for backing up my System Image should my Operating System (OS) experience major problems.  The entire backup process implemented is shown in the below Figure.

This describes the backup process performed at my home office for my System Image, User Files and both Working and Archived Pictures.

 

Equally important is having a process for backing up your images in the field and verifying the integrity of your images years in the future.  On travel, I use a 160GB HyperDrive COLORSPACE UDMA from B&H Photo and Video for backing up my CompactFlash cards.  It can perform some integrity checks as part of the backup process, in addition to quickly downloading your pictures.  As a nicety, you can view your photos as they are downloaded or after they are downloaded on its mediocre screen.  A very handy device for backing up in the field.  My only complaint is that it does not backup video files, only pictures files (RAW, DNG, TIFF, JPG, etc.).  Not that I shoot a lot of video, but that would be useful as I do use video to capture moments.

Finally, how do you verify the integrity of your files for years to come?  If you shoot RAW and convert them to Digital Negatives (DNG), then all you have to do is convert your DNG files through Adobe’s DNG Converter (FREE) and it will automatically check to ensure the integrity of the file by checking that no bits have changed.  The reason for this is that DNG files, besides being 0-20% smaller than proprietary RAW files, it also stores an MD5 hash for the raw image contained in the DNG.  The MD5 algorithm can also be used for validating the integrity of all of your other files and/or folders full of files.  I settled on the MD5 Checksum Verifier utility from FlashPlayerPro ($15) because this program can quickly generate a separate MD5 hash file for an individual file or an entire folder full of files that I can keep with the files and folders.  In addition, you can then at some later date recheck the file(s) for comparison against the MD5 hash stored for verification that nothing has been modified in the file(s).  Because my working pictures are, well, being worked I only use this on my archive pictures.

With a few external hard drives and some free software, you can easily have a reliable, simple backup solution at your home office.  In the field, it can be a bit more costly but there are some very effective solutions such as using your laptop and external hard drives.  Then for future verification, a simple MD5 hash checker and DNG converter works out great for validating the integrity of your backup files.  Here are a few references to assist you.  Hope this helps saves you from loosing your data in the future.

A revision of this article was published in the Mile High Wildlife Photography Club (MHWPC) May 2013 newsletter.